Charity Event – “Time for Tea”

Join us for a late morning / early afternoon of tea, coffee, juice, cakes, games and more. We’re raising money for two amazing charities, and we’d love you to be a part of it.

Homemade cakes and biscuits, including:

Monkey Bread!
Lemon Drizzle!
Cupcakes!
Shortbread!

Tea, coffee and juice will also be available.

If you’re in the area, please come on down…

Tarbock Village Hall, Netherley Road, Tarbock Green nr. Prescot, Merseyside, L35 1QG

Time for Tea 2

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What’s for dinner?

We have a bit of a thing in our house, where 3 of us like donner meat, and 1 of us doesn’t.  Unusually, it’s the hubby who doesn’t like it…  He’s always called it “road kill”, and this conversation sort of spiralled out of control one day, and kebab meat is now known as “dog”.  This brings me on to the conversation I’ve just had…

Me:  “What’s for dinner?”

Hubby:  “I don’t even want to think about it yet – I’m fed up of cooking…”

Me:  “Well, we can either go the chippy, or we can go out for dinner?”

At this point, Gning and Donut come in to the room.  I ask Gning…

Me:  “Would you like chippy tonight?”

Gning:  “Yes!  I want dog!”

doner-kebab-pitta

Parenting done right if you ask me.  He loves donner kebabs with salad and sweet chilli & mayo – just like his mmymmy.


**For my readers who are not from the UK – a “chippy” is a take-away.

What’s the difference between Great Britain and the United Kingdom?

 

The Pendle Witches

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It is the most famous witch trial of the 17th century, the case of the Pendle Witches. Twelve women were accused of witchcraft, and while one died, eleven went to trial. One was tried and found guilty at York while ten of the ‘witches’ were tried at Lancaster. Only one woman was found not guilty.

Six of the eleven ‘witches’ on trial came from two rival families in Pendle. Elizabeth Southerns (Old Demdike) and Anne Whittle (Mother Chattox) were the old, poverty stricken matriarchs of the Demdike and Chattox families respectively. For over fifty years, Old Demdike had been known as a witch and in the 17th century, it was an accepted part of village life that some village healers practised magic and dealt in herbs and medicines.

The 17th century was also a time when witchcraft was not only feared but also fascinated. King James I was greatly interested in witchcraft even before he became King of England in 1603. One of King James’s literary works, Daemonologie, instructed readers to condemn and prosecute both supporters and practitioners of witchcraft. As the scepticism of the King was heightened, the feelings of unrest and fear over witchcraft became familiar with his people.

The story of the Pendle Witches began with the altercation between one of the accused ‘witches’, Alizon Device, and John Law, a pedlar. While travelling, Alizon passed John Law on the road and asked for some pins though Law refused her request. It is said that Alizon cursed John Law and a short while after he suffered a stroke, for which he blamed Alizon and her mystical powers. When the incident was brought to trial, Alizon Device confessed that she had instructed the Devil to blame John Law. After further questioning, Alizon divulged that her grandmother, Old Demdike, and members of the rival Chattox family regularly practiced witchcraft. The two families had been feuding for years and for the Chattox family, Alizon’s accusations were just an act of revenge.

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The trials of the Pendle Witches were held at Lancaster Castle on 17th and 19th August 1612. The dark, damp and dirty dungeon where the ‘witches’ were held were too much for Old Demdike to bear and she died before she could be brought to trial. One of the most surprising things about the Pendle Witch trials was the principal supplier of evidence. Jennet Device was only nine years old and usually wouldn’t have been allowed to testify in a trial because of her age. Under King James I’s system, all standard rules were suspended when giving evidence in a witch trial. Jennet gave evidence against her mother, sister and brother. It was reported that when the young girl spoke against her mother, Elizabeth, the accused witch had to be dragged from court screaming and cursing her daughter.

Alizon Device, Elizabeth Device, James Device, Anne Whittle, Anne Redferne, Alice Nutter, Katherine Hewitt, John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock were all found guilty at Lancaster. They were hanged at Gallows Hill on 20th August 1612. Elizabeth Southern lost her life while awaiting trial, and Alice Grey was found not guilty.

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In the present day, Pendle Hill hosts a Halloween hilltop gathering every year and in the Borough of Pendle, the witches have become the inspiration for its tourism and heritage industries.

So this Halloween, why not pay a visit to Pendle Hill and relive the sorcery and paranormal goings-on that occurred there over 400 years ago. You’re sure to be in for a spooky surprise!

What is it about Scousers..?

Residents of every city have their quirks – and Scousers are no exception. From our language oddities and humour to our love of proper food, our excellent music taste and our intolerance for badly cooked scouse, here are 28 things you should know before dating someone from Liverpool.

RINGO IS OUR LEAST FAVOURITE

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WE MIGHT CALL EVERYONE LOVE BUT DON’T CONFUSE IT WITH LOVE, ALRIGHT LOVE?

kendoz

YOU MUST LEARN TO MAKE SCOUSE

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AND CHOOSE BETWEEN BEETROOT OR CABBAGE. IT CAN’T BE BOTH.

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DESPITE WHAT YOU’VE HEARD, LIVERPOOL IS ONE OF THE SAFEST CITIES AND WE’LL KEEP IT THAT WAY

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YOU MUST SUPPORT THE TEAM WE DO, OR AT LEAST PRETEND

eve

MEETING OUR MA IS A BIG THING

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AND MEETING OUR NAN IS EVEN BIGGER

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OUR ACCENT IS LIKELY TO CONFUSE YOU 

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SPEAKING OF WHICH, YOU PROBABLY SHOULDN’T TRY DO THE ACCENT (OR ASK US TO SAY CHICKEN)

george

WE’RE PRETTY CULTURED FOLK

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AND WE’LL HAVE YOU IN TEARS LAUGHING ALL NIGHT

klopp

WE LOVE A GOOD PARTY

sl

AND BUYING US A NABZYS AT THE END OF IT IS THE WAY TO OUR HEART

nabzys

WE CARE ABOUT OUR OWN

hug

IF WE TELL YOU WE’VE GOT A COB ON, IT’S NOTHING TO DO WITH CORN

cob

WE STAND UP FOR WHAT WE BELIEVE IN

lpool

AND WE WILL NEVER GIVE UP

never

WE CALL THIS A CHIP BARM

barm

NOT A MUFFIN, OR ROLL, A BARM!

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WE’VE GOT BOSS MUSIC TASTE AND LOVE A GOOD GIG

music

AND WE’RE FASHIONABLE BUGGERS, TOO (SOMETIMES)

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MOST OF THE TIME WE’RE BEING SARCASTIC

willy

WE’LL SHARE THE BILL BUT NOT THE FOOD

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WE’RE PROUD OF OUR CITY

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BUT DON’T TAKE OURSELVES SERIOUSLY

scouz

YOU’LL ALWAYS BE SECOND TO OUR FIRST LOVE; LIVERPOOL

bev

ONCE YOU GO SCOUSE, YOU NEVER GO BACK

scousers

My 3 year old photographer – Pic heavy

At the beginning of the month, the hubby took Gning away for the night, in a lovely little country inn, just outside the town of Penrith.  Now, my little man absolutely loves technology.  Because of his interest, hubby gave him his old Olympus digital camera (14MP), with fully charged batteries, and a blank SD card.

The following pictures were all shot by the Gning himself…  Bear in mind that he is only 3 years old.

(For a clearer view of each picture, you can click on each image to make it larger.)

The classic "foot shot"

The classic “foot shot”

Pound Cafe – Huyton Village

It’s been a while since I posted here, so why not start again with a review?  🙂

The Pound Cafe in Huyton Village, Merseyside, is attached to the Pound Bakery.  As it says on the tin, everything is £1 (or under)!

Whilst walking through the village, my son and I were on our way back to the car when he said “I want dinner…”.  I was only going to nip in to the bakery, but I thought, ‘why not.  It’s the same price, and we get to have a little sit down too’.

Jpeg

On entering the Pound Cafe, it was clean, bright, and there were plenty of seats, tables and booths available.  That’s not to say that the place was empty…  There were about 30 or so people in there, all with full cups and half empty plates in front of them.  They all seemed to be enjoying themselves.

I approached an empty booth (in bright green!), and sat my 2 year old down with his new inflatable “Spongebob” toy.  I told him to stay there, to mind the table, and I would go and order for us.

I went to the fridge area first, and picked up a can of 7up.  It was warm.  I checked the other cans and bottles in the refrigeration unit, and they were all the same.  I dread to think what the sandwiches and cakes were like in there…  I let this go though, as temperatures outside were 26C.  Incredibly warm.

The lady behind the counter greeted me with a “what can I get you?”.  No smile, no eye contact, just a gruff voice.

I ordered a child’s sausage roll, chips and beans for William, and a jumbo sausage roll for myself.  I then paid the £2.80 for my order, and I was handed a number sign to place on the table, so the cafe assistant knew where to bring our food to.  The sign was bright orange, with a black laminated piece of paper attached, with a large ’27’ in white.  The sign stand was dirty and greasy.  It looked like they hadn’t bothered to give it a wipe in months.

Wanting to get back, I just grabbed the top of the sign, and returned to my waiting boy.

Jpeg

20 minutes passed, and I actually asked William (out loud), “how long does it take to put a couple of sausage rolls on a plate?”

A further 10 minutes, and we finally had our plates put down in front of us.

My jumbo sausage roll was delicious.  The pastry was flaky, and the sausage meat was well cooked.  All together, I would certainly give it a 10 out of 10.

My sons, however, did not look as appetising.  He had a plate with a cut-off (not even half) a jumbo sausage roll (the menu stated it would be a full, ‘standard’ sausage roll), a big spoonful of baked beans (that looked like plastic), and the chips were anemic and hard.  That wasn’t the worst part, to be honest.  I wasn’t bothered about the chips, as William had said that he wanted the sausage roll and beans.  Now, if you were a server in a cafe / restaurant, would you serve a child’s meal on a hot plate?  No?  Neither would I.  These, however, did.  The plate was so hot that even I couldn’t touch it.

Back to the food…  William had one fork full of beans, and responded with “I don’t like them.  They’re cold.”  I tasted them, and I agreed.  He then had a bite of the sausage roll…  Soggy pastry, and cold meat.  Work that out.  Hot plate, cold food.

I didn’t bother saying anything.  Even if I did try to speak up, the staff seemed as if they weren’t bothered.  One particular woman who worked there, was busy standing outside (near enough in the doorway!!), smoking a cigarette, and talking to a customer.  She shouted back in to the shop, to a customer, “be with you in a minute, love”.

Overall results:

Jumbo sausage roll – 10/10

Childs’ sausage roll dinner – 0/10

Can of 7up – 9/10 (not the cans’ fault that the fridge didn’t work, although still lost a point for being warm)

I think that I will be sticking to the bakery in the future.